How Colleges Can Attract Workers

In 2008, PEW Research published a study investigating the reasons people either remain in or move away from their hometown. The study found that—among characteristics measured such as gender, age, race, and family income—the largest difference between those who moved and those who stayed centered around educational attainment. Among the people surveyed, 77% of the college graduates had moved at least once, compared to only 56% of those without college degrees.

Math Majors Solve Employers Problems

With students packing up to go back to college this month with declared or undeclared majors, it’s a good time to consider the fields that graduating students are going into and whether they match up with the skills businesses need. Do the math.

Students in Distress

Student loan debt ballooned during the Great Recession, and student loan default rates have nearly doubled since 2007. One leading explanation for the rising default rates has been the growth of “non-traditional” borrowers attending community colleges and for-profit institutions. The tendency of these borrowers to be older, from less-wealthy families, complete programs at lower rates, and have weaker labor market outcomes (employment and earnings) all contribute to higher default rates.

What Does Your Degree Do For You?

If your accounting degree landed you a job as a financial analyst in the Richmond metro area, Virginia, do you know what that gets you? Well, for starters, your entry-level wages are somewhere around $55,000 per year. The average worker earns $83,000 per year and experienced workers earn $111,000 per year. About 45% of all accountants in the Richmond metro area have a bachelor’s degree while 38% have their masters.