Putting Corporate Tax Reform in Perspective

Since assuming office in January, the Trump Administration has taken steps to enact policies with a wide range of impacts in the areas of healthcare, environment, immigration, and the economy. Economic policies have not been at the front and center of the media or public discourse lately, but understanding what may come is still extremely important. Potential changes in economic policies may include personal income tax cuts, corporate tax reform, and federal budget shifts, each of which can be quite complex. In this blog, we take a closer look at the different proposals for corporate tax reform.

The Economic Effect of the Proposed Economic Policy of the Trump Administration

With the election over, Chmura evaluates the economic effects of the proposed economic policy changes by the Trump Administration. The major policy initiatives involve lowering corporate and individual income taxes, reducing business regulations, increasing military spending and infrastructure investment, and changing trade policies. If implemented, the Trump economic policies will have widespread impacts on the economy, affecting personal consumption, business investment, government spending, as well as imports and exports. Those policies can boost short-term economic growth, yet the long-term effects are less certain.

Midwest’s Manufacturing Mojo: Chemical MFG

The Midwest is where a typical 250-worker chemical manufacturer should locate if it is in an expansion mode, per LaborEQ. The Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana metropolitan statistical area has a slight advantage over the next three sites shown in the table below due to its lower cost of living and an impressive pipeline of new graduates to fill jobs in that industry.

Strong Gains in Median Household Income Last Year

According to data released in the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2015 Income and Poverty in the United States report, median household income jumped 5.2% in real terms last year, the largest increase since the Census Bureau began recording such data in 1967. Despite the healthy jump in median household income last year, however, it still remains slightly below where it stood in 2007, the beginning of the

Internal Rate of Return (IRR) Tends to Overstate Education Return on Investment (ROI)

With dwindling government appropriations for higher education and elevated student loan default rates, more colleges and universities are conducting Return on Investment (ROI) analysis to demonstrate that higher education is a sound investment for students, taxpayers, and society at large. Those institutions include for-profit colleges, community colleges, and public and private not-for-profit four-year colleges.